Five signs people are lying on their resume

Lying on resumes is becoming more and more common. When college students were asked in the same study by the Human Resource Managers, over 70% said they would lie on their resumes to land their dream job. The managers provide helpful advice to target the lies efficiently. Below are nine of the most common areas where lies will appear on resumes.

P.S.: The “newspaper test” for lying on resumes would suggest one not do it.

The recent decision by the Australian Tax Office to first sack and then prosecute former staff for fraud for lying on their resume sends a clear warning to anyone thinking of fibbing on their CV.


Yahoo CEO Fired For Lying On Resume

P.S.: The “newspaper test” for lying on resumes would suggest one not do it.

And the potential ramifications are even greater than that — once fired for lying on your resume, do you list that job on your resume and have your new boss call and find out the truth, or do you leave it off and just keep lying, hoping that you’re not caught again? It’s a vicious cycle.


Given such repercussions as Mary's fate, you might wonder why anyone would attempt to get away with lying on a resume in the first place. Levitt refers to a W.C. Fields quote in his explanation: "Anything worth winning is worth cheating for." Given such repercussions as Mary’s fate, you might wonder why anyone would attempt to get away with lying on a resume in the first place. Levitt refers to a W.C. Fields quote in his explanation: “Anything worth winning is worth cheating for.”Damage to Your Reputation
You can pretty much kiss your employment references goodbye if you're found to have provided false information on your resume. Even if your employer doesn't terminate the employment relationship for the fraudulent information, you'll still have to suffer the embarrassment of having your employer know you lied. Additionally, our digital-age lives make it easier and easier for us to network with other professionals in similar industries. In fields that are small or specialized, word can travel pretty quickly. If someone lost a job due to dishonesty, there's a good chance the word will get out. Some recruiters have even been known to flag candidates who have been found to have fraudulent information on their resumes. A simple lie could have career-long consequences.

Possible Legal Action
Generally speaking, employees who have lied on their resumes have no legal recourse against their former employers. This can also impact a former employee's ability to seek legal recourse for an employer's actions which may have been legitimately illegal. This is known as the "after-acquired evidence" theory. If the employment relationship was found to be based upon fraudulent information to start with, illegal acts which occurred during the employment relationship may not be actionable by law. It's sad to think that employees could lose what limited rights they do have in employment relationships as a result of unethical decisions made during recruitment.

The Bottom Line
Given the relative ease of digging up the truth, and the unpleasant potential outcomes of lying to a new employer, it's hard to believe that anyone would risk putting false information in a resume. However, we've all heard the phrase "desperate times call for desperate measures." It's true that make some people resort to risky behavior. However, this creates an unfair advantage over honest, legitimate candidates who aren't lying on their resumes. For those who are considering providing false information to a potential employer, consider how much an employer might appreciate the honest approach. There are honest ways to deal with absences from the workplace, incomplete degrees or even dismissals from previous jobs that won't hurt your chances of getting a new job.Think again. History is littered with names such as these: George O'Leary, former football coach for Notre Dame, for lying on his resume about a master's degree he never earned and an exaggerated position on the University of New Hampshire football team. Sandra Baldwin, former president of the United States Olympic Committee, when a reporter revealed she never earned the doctoral degree she claimed on her resume.